4th Grade Science Fair Project Ideas

Experiments on this page are suitable for the 4th grade science fair projects. they are based on some well known scientific laws or simple observations and do not require any kind of theoretical research. Some of them may require additional work with references.

All 4th grade science fair projects on this page can be complete within relatively short time. There are projects that can be done within one day and others that may require few days or couple of weeks. Non of them requires any kind of special equipment.

At this age the science project requires some work on organizing results of the observations in a tables and making some kind of conclusion based on the results.

Experiment

Growing crystal.

Growing crystals is a great 4th grade science fair project. At home you can manage to grow a big and glossy copper sulfate crystal and impress your classmates and teachers. Copper sulfate is a chemical used as a fungicide and herbicide for garden ponds. You can buy it in form of blue powder in garden shops. Read how to grow crystal for science project here.

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Speedy Snails.

In this 4th grade science project you'll work with the snails. Do you know how fast do snails move? Which factors affect their speed?

The goal:

find how surface roughness affects the snail's average speed.

Hypothesis: Snails will move slower on the dry and rough surface and faster on the smooth or wet surface. Even if the surfaces has the same roughness snail will travel faster on the wet surface.

Constants: temperature of the surface, all environmental variables. Variables: Roughness of the test surface, wetness of the test surface.

You'll need:

Procedure:

For each kind of a surface, put the snail in the center of the surface sample. As soon as the snail starts to move, run the timer until the snail reaches the edge of the sample. Stop the timer. If the snail movement wasn't straight mark the snail's path. Measure the distance that snail traveled and find the snail's speed. (Speed=Distance/Time). Repeat the procedure several times for each surface (and for different snails). Calculate average snail speed for each surface. Do the same trials for the wet surfaces. Is there any difference in the snail speed?

Variant of the project: you can setup similar experiment answering following questions:

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How the Amount of Light Affects Germination and Growth.

The goal of the project is to find out how different lighting conditions affect seeds germination and growth.

Hypothesis:

Light is extremely important for plants. Seeds will germinate faster and grow better in the presence of light.

Materials:

Procedure:

Results:

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Does salt or sugar affect water evaporation?

The Goal:

to find out how different concentrations of salt and/or sugar solutions will affect water evaporation rate.

Hypothesis:

Solvable minerals and other chemical compounds have effect on the water evaporation.

Materials:

Constants: temperature, air pressure, humidity. Variables: Concentrations of salt and sugar in the water.

Procedure:

Results:

If you were making regular observations and records you should be able to make a table and graphs for evaporation rate for each liquid. Can you tell the difference between pure water evaporation rate and salt solution evaporation rate? What about sugar?

Reference materials:

Evaporation rate explanation + calculator.

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Does a magnetic field affect the germination process?

There are many claims that magnetic field can positively affect processes in living organisms. In this experiment we'll test these claims.

You'll need:

Hypothesis:

If a strong magnetic field is good for living organisms, seeds probably should germinate faster in its presence. They may also grow faster. The effect of the field should be easy to measure by measurement of the root and sprout length.

Constants: temperature, humidity, amount of water, plant species.
Variable: presence of magnet, strength of magnetic field.

Procedure:

Results:

Is there a difference in the number of germinated plants in control and experimental container? Was there difference in germination time?

Calculate average length of the roots and average length of the stem for control and experimental container. (To calculate average length add length for each plant and divide result by number of measured plants)

Can you see any difference in the plants that were growing in the control container and in the magnetic container?

Important tips:
Make sure that temperature and lighting conditions are exactly the same for both containers.

Variations:
You can try this experiment with other model animals and plants you can also use "magnetized water" instead of a magnetic field.

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Potato battery science project.

Using the most ordinary things, such as a nail, copper wire and potato you can get an electricity. If you combine three of these batteries, you can get enough current to power the LED light bulb, or tiny digital clock.read how to make potato battery here

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Water and conductivity.

The goal:

Compare water conductivity to conductivity of different concentration salt solutions.

Hypothesis: water can conduct electricity better if it have salt dissolved in it.

You'll need:

Procedure:

Variations: You can modify or extend this 4th grade science fair project. Measure resistance of other solutions (soda, vinegar, soap) and different materials (including living organisms).

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Anti-Freeze.

Pure water turns into ice at temperature 0C (32F). What happens if you dissolve different chemical compounds in the water? Will salt or sugar prevent water from freezing or slow down the process? You'll find  it out in this 4th grade project. It's simple and can be done in 24 hours.

Hypothesis: Salt, sugar or soda will slow down or prevent water freezing.

Constants: Volume of test chambers, temperature in the freezer, time slots.

Variables: Concentrations of salt, sugar.

You'll need:

Procedure:

Arrange your results in the table. Do they support original hypothesis?

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Electromagnet.

The goal of this simple 4th grade experiment is to build electromagnet and experiment with it.

You'll need:

Procedure:

What to research:

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